Things you should how about home theatre projectors

Things you should how about home theatre projectors

If you’re going to get the most from your home theatre setup, you really need a big picture for that full moviegoing experience. A TV, however large, may just not cut it, so many people turn instead to buying a projector. What is a projector, how does it work, and what do you need to know before choosing one?

If you’re going to get the most from your home theatre setup, you really need a big picture for that full moviegoing experience. A TV, however large, may just not cut it, so many people turn instead to buying a projector. What is a projector, how does it work, and what do you need to know before choosing one?

Image technology

There are two types of projector technologies in common use. LCD systems work by shining light through an LCD screen, similar to that of a phone or TV. DLP (Digital Light Processing) systems use a chip with microscopic mirrors.

DLP has a high contrast ratio and can produce an image as good as film. However, the technology means it has fewer pixels than an LCD. LCD systems are brighter and have high contrast and good colour saturation, but they can lose image quality over time. Most home automation companies should have both types available on display so you can see the differences for yourself.

Image technology

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Bright and shiny

One of the most important factors in choosing a projector is brightness. This is measured in lumens, and most projectors will be somewhere between 800 and 3000. Less than 1000 lumens means you’ll probably need to use the projector in a darkened room and it will only be able to cope with smaller screen sizes. Models with above 1000 lumens will be able to cope with some ambient lighting and handle larger screen sizes. For bright rooms, you’ll need 3000 lumens or more, but these are the most expensive. Good home automation companies like Digital Interiors should be able to advise on the best option for your room.

The screen resolution is important, too. For HD content or Blu-ray, you should be looking for a system that offers 1920 x 1080 resolution. Most projectors have “keystone correction”. This has nothing to do with silent film policemen; instead, it refers to adjusting the image so that it appears flat on the screen even if the projector is angled.

You also need to understand the throw ratio. This is the distance the projector needs to be from the screen to produce a good image. Generally, the larger the picture, the further away the projector will need to be from the screen.

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